Tristiropsis acutangula

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Tristiropsis acutangula

Description

Tree, up to 35(-53) m, dbh up to at least 6 cm, often with buttresses up to 3 m high, 4 m wide, and 3 cm thick. Branchlets 4-10 mm thick, fulvous -tomentose, glabrescent and then shiny purple-brown, older parts more or less pustular lenti-cellate. Leaves up to 2 m long; Sepals cream to greenish, persistent and black in fruit, Petals cuneate at base, broad-elliptic to broad-ovate, 2.5-3.5 b) 2.2-2.5 mm, creamy-white, margin below the insertion of the scale long-ciliate, furthermore sparsely ciliate, apex crenulate, inside glabrous; Stamens: Fruits ellipsoid to subglobular, widest about or above the middle, narrowed to short-stipitate at base, 3-4-angular to 3-4-ribbed in cross section, 20-30 by 14-25 mm, yellowish green to dark-yellow when ripe, patently short-hairy inside, often sterile but well developed.

Distribution

Admiralty Islands present, Asia-Tropical: Maluku (Maluku present); New Guinea present; Philippines (Philippines present), Australasia: Queensland (Queensland present), Ba-wean present, Basilan present, Carolines present, Christmas Island present, Flores present, Guam present, Halmahera present, Kangean Archipelago present, Madura present, Mindanao present, Mindoro present, P. Muna near SE Celebes present, Pacific: Marianas present, Palau Is present, SE Borneo present, Solomon Islands present, Sula and Kai Islands present, Timor present
Marianas (Guam), Carolines (Palau Is.), Solomon Islands, Queensland, and Malesia: Christmas Island, Kangean Archipelago, Ba-wean, Madura (acc. to Meijer Drees), Flores, Timor, SE Borneo, Philippines (Mindoro, Guima-ras I., Basilan, Mindanao), P. Muna near SE Celebes, Moluccas (Halmahera, Sula and Kai Islands), New Guinea, and the Admiralty Islands.

Uses

The wood is said to be hard, heavy, and durable, and is used as a timber. For a description of the timber, see p. 427.

Notes

Tristiropsis obtusangula Radlk., the other syntype of the genus, is almost certainly conspe-cific with T. acutangula. The type specimen of the former (Gaudichaud s.n. in P) differs only by the distinctly stipitate, flattened-ellipsoid (not at all angular) fruits. It is from the Marianas; just like the other specimen available (Moran 4680, Guam), which is in flower and shows no differences with T. acutangula.

Citation

Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 865
P. Royen - in Man. For. Trees Papua & New Guinea. 1964: 49
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 866
Hosokawa - in Trans. Nat. Hist. Soc. Form. 1935: 30
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 865
Radlk. - in Sitzungsber. Math.-Phys. Cl. Köningl. Bayer. Akad. Wiss. Munchen. 1890: 248
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 863
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 863
Whitmore - in Gard. Bull. Sing. 1957: 17
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 864
Radlk. - in Sitzungsber. Math.-Phys. Cl. Köningl. Bayer. Akad. Wiss. Munchen. 1890: 248
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 864
Rad.k. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 864
Radlk. - in Engl., Pflanzenr. 98. 1932: 866
Backer & Bakh. f. - in Fl. Java. 1965: 136
Foreman, Check List Bougainville. 1971: fig.
Meijer Drees - in Comm. For. Res. Inst. 1951: 110
S.T Reynolds - in Fl. Austral. 1985: map 8
Merr. - in Enum. Philipp. Flow. Pl. 1923: 502
Guillaumin - in Ann. Jard. Bot. Buitenzorg. 1912: 214